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Monthly Archives: December 2015

Discovery of Dinosaur Tracks Sheds Light on Prehistoric Giants

A newly discovered collection of rare dinosaur tracks comprising of hundreds sauropod footprints and handprints has provided scientists the opportunity to shed some light on the behaviour of some of the biggest animals to have ever lived on land. The collection, which was found on the Isle of Skye and contains hundreds of handprints and […]

https://thezoologyblog.wordpress.com/2015/12/30/discovery-of-dinosaur-tracks-sheds-light-on-prehistoric-giants/

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51% rise in Scottish children going to school hungry, stealing food – survey

Crippling government austerity measures are forcing schoolchildren in Scotland to go hungry, steal food from their peers and develop mental health issues, teachers have claimed. Source: 51% rise in Scottish children going to school hungry, stealing food – survey — RT UK RT UK 30 Dec, 2015 © Suzanne Plunkett / Reuters   Crippling government […]

https://talesfromtheloublog.wordpress.com/2015/12/30/51-rise-in-scottish-children-going-to-school-hungry-stealing-food-survey/

Merry Christmas

Merry Christmas

Farming and Sustaining Life on Mars

Mars for the Many released an article about the tips of things humans would need to sustain life on Mars.  The focus was more focused on the farming aspect and how to maintain farming or growing food in any capacity. Being able to colonize another planet would be a major milestone.  

Colonizing anothe planet could be accomplished in our lifetime.  They could develope the companies independently like the space station and send them to Mars.  The only hard part would be getting the individual parts to the same area and undamaged. If they can send unmanned robots to Mars we are already in that mindset. They (and by they I am thinking like NASA or space x) could send the modules months or even years before human arrive. If they could somehow find away to recycle the salt water or make fresh water and store it, that would be huge first step. 

Trying to colonize another planet does bring up a few concerns.  The concerns would be that we have not come far enough or learned enough from the Biosphere 2 project. Many of the problems that Biosphere 2 had should have been resolved by now and could be applied to future plans. It was a good first step but it may have been to big of a step.  Maybe if they scaled it back they may have had a more realistic view of how to maintain life.

 I think if they wanted to seriously consider the same approach the do not need several biomes in oder to sustain life. The biggest hurdles would be to develope a renewable source of food.  Eventually, adding in renewable sources of protein. 

Ceder Point Mill in Kansas

  
David Eulitt had an article written about him in the Kansas City Star On December 19.  Currently, he is restoring an old mill in Ceder Point, Kansas. The 2.5 story mill is located at First and Main Sts. in the Community of Cedar Point, Kansas., a town that grew up around the grist mill. Many of those old buildings are very cool and should not be left to mother natures rath.  Many of these old buildings should be rehabbed so we do not loose a piece of history.  The only draw back would be that it is in a ghost town.  It would be nice to think that a historic building like this being rehabbed would bring in people to visit, live work but one building in ghost town may not be enough to support such a town.

Brief History:

In 1867, a log dam was built across the Cottonwood River, and a wooden-frame mill was constructed for sawing lumber. The frame mill was built in the spring of 1868 by two Pennsylvanians, Orlo H. Drinkwater and Peter Schriver (of Yorktown, Pa.). The following year (1868) it was converted to grind flour and named Cedar Point Mill.

In 1870, the name was changed to Drinkwater & Schriver Mill. In 1871, construction of the current stone structure was started. In 1875, the building was completed. It used stone burrs to grind corn and wheat into flour, with a capacity of 75 barrels per day. In 1884, the log dam was replaced by a stone dam.

In 1976, some original equipment still remained in the mill and it was still in operation. It was in use by various owners until the late 1980s. Since then, it has fallen into disrepair. It’s one of the few mills left in Kansas that haven’t fallen apart. The mill was put on the National Refister of Historical Places in 2006.

Sources and extra Information:

http://www.kansascity.com/living/article50325600.html
http://www.cedarpointmill.com